Planning a Trip to Iceland in April

Planning a Trip to Iceland in April

We’re currently planning another trip to Iceland in April. Planning a trip to Iceland or anywhere is so much easier when you’ve been there before. I remember feeling quite overwhelmed when I was planning our first trip in 2013. So much to see, so little time! (Two weeks is barely enough time to see everything Iceland has to offer, unfortunately.) Though not being able to afford to rent a 4×4 vehicle did help limit our options a little bit.

Planning for this year’s trip to Iceland in April has been a lot easier because we already know what to expect and we know what we want to see and where, how to get there and so on. Well, at least we kind of know what to expect. We’ve never been to Iceland in April before and googling “Iceland in April” didn’t really yield in anything that satisfied my curiosity (I tend to trust independent reviews from other travellers more, but here’s a summary from a hotel chain), or that basically said “go to Iceland in April, it’s the best time ever!” which is what I’d really like to hear. ;-)
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How to Circumnavigate Iceland Without Getting Too Lost

How to Circumnavigate Iceland Without Getting Too Lost

If you’ve been following some Icelandic news sources this week, you would’ve read the news about an American tourist who, while driving from the airport to his hotel in downtown Reykjavik on his first visit to Iceland, got so terribly lost and somehow ended up in a sleepy, northern Iceland town of Siglufjörður, at least 5 hour drive away from Reykjavik. In his defense, he was tired after a red-eye flight and he just went where the car GPS unit told him to go, in addition to the hotel not spelling the street name correctly in the address. But still, had he used a little more common sense, I don’t think he would have ended that far off course from his original destination. He should’ve at the very least known that Reykjavik was where he needed to go and that it was only less than an hour drive away from the Keflavik airport. He’s become some sort of a celebrity because of this mishap. Fancy that!

I found the roads in Iceland to be pretty well-marked. We managed to navigate ourselves around Iceland (even took some detours away from the ring road) without getting terribly lost, and all we had with us was a copy of a good, old-fashioned, paper map of Iceland, which we didn’t even use that much. Granted, we also had an access to Google Maps on my tablet but we only ever used it to navigate our way around Akureyri and Reykjavik, two of Iceland bigger cities, which our paper map didn’t cover very well. So, here are some tips I could give you in order to not get lost during your Iceland road trip:
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