№ 10 – Búðir, Snæfellsnes, Iceland

№ 10 – Búðir, Snæfellsnes, Iceland

I had been looking forward to taking pictures of this church at Búðir in Snæfellsnes Peninsula because the location is very picturesque, but earlier in the day, the boat that was supposed to take us on a whale-watching tour left without us because apparently Icelandic people are not the greatest at at marking places so we missed the area where we were supposed to board the boat. When we finally found it with a help from a local Icelandic family we met at the harbour, the boat already left even though it was still before the time it was supposed to leave. We’d already had a whale-watching tour cancelled when we were in Northern Iceland (and the tour operator didn’t even bother to notify us about it being cancelled so we had a hurried breakfast that morning for nothing — could’ve had more of that tasty, homemade skyr at the B&B otherwise) so I was feeling extra bummed about it.

Anyway, when we got to Búðir, I was quite the Ms. Grumpy McGrumpsalot and my heart wasn’t really in it when I was taking pictures of the surroundings. We could have taken the path to a nearby beach but didn’t because I was grumpy and now I kind of regret it. Oh well. Some other time. When we go back to Iceland to explore the Westfjords (the only region we didn’t get to see in our first visit), we will have to give Snæfellsnes Peninsula another chance for sure.

Addendum: We’re one-tenth of the way through the 100 Places Project! Hurray!

№ 9 – Spirit Island, Alberta, Canada

№ 9 – Spirit Island, Alberta, Canada

You don’t have to have the ability to walk on water to get to Spirit Island by foot from the mainland. You could just simply walk there. But you probably don’t want to do that or you would make a whole bunch of tourists angry for ruining their pictures of one of the most photographed spots in the Canadian Rockies.

You can only get to Spirit Island by taking the Maligne Lake boat tour (well, you could probably hike there but it might take a while). The boat tour was a little pricey but I guess the beautiful scenery we saw during the tour made it worth it.

We had to sit around waiting for our boat for quite a while. I remember us making some stupid videos while waiting because we were bored. There wasn’t really much to do there otherwise. Well, we could’ve rented a canoe or a kayak, but that would’ve been redundant. At least the surrounding view was pretty.

Spirit Island is located on Maligne Lake within Jasper National Park, which is one of my favourite Canadian national parks. If you have to choose between Jasper and Banff National Parks to visit, go for Jasper. You won’t regret it! It’s just as beautiful but not as touristy. Too bad it’s about four hours away from where we will be in June.

№ 8 – Norris Point, Newfoundland, Canada

№ 8 – Norris Point, Newfoundland, Canada

Norris Point is a quaint little town in Bonne Bay, within the beautiful Gros Morne National Park. It is home to the most excellent Bonne Bay Marine Station where we had a fun, educational time one morning, getting introduced, up close and personal, to some interesting sea creatures, some of which we even got the chance to touch.

While I was busy taking pictures of the sunset one evening, a local man was filling my husband and his dad in on all the latest local gossips. Later I learned that the man actually had his own show at the local radio station. We sure got all the gossips from the best source!

Anyway, I just realized that I had lost a two-day’s worth of photos from the Newfoundland trip due to some photo transferring kerfuffle that happened about a year ago. Pretty bummed about it, but there really isn’t much we can do about it. Oh well. Live and learn.

Photos from Pinhole Day 2014

The last Sunday of April is the Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day, or Pinhole Day for short. This year, it fell on April 27, which was yesterday. I managed to talk my husband into driving me to the town of Goderich, Ontario by the Lake Huron to take some pinhole photos with my trusty Lumix GF1 and the Pinwide pinhole “lens” (basically a body cap with a hole on it), which has been my Pinhole Day set-up for a couple of years now.

We were planning on going to Goderich on Easter Friday but decided against it because it was rainy. I later learned that a dead body was found at the beach where we would’ve been if we went there that day (which is where we were yesterday). Got to say, I’m happy not to be one of the people who found it. I don’t know if my head would be able to handle any more traumatizing experiences.
Read More

№ 7 – Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

№ 7 – Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Victoria is situated in Vancouver Island. We took a ferry ride there from the mainland. It was a pleasant one. We passed quite a few cute little islands along the way and enjoyed some beautiful views.

The picture above is of the British Columbia Parliament Buildings. I believe it was tai chi day when we were there, which explains the crowd in front of it.

I don’t really remember much about this city other than that it was a beautiful city and that my husband accidentally drove the car into an opposing traffic lane one night. Ooops! I blame it on the stupid car GPS.

I would love to go back there again one day to see more of the city. We didn’t get to see much at the time due to time constraints.

№ 6 – Hvítserkur, Iceland

№ 6 – Hvítserkur, Iceland

Of all the rock formations in Iceland that are said to have been a troll at some point, Hvítserkur is my favourite. It looks like a 15-meter tall monster rising out of the sea. Pretty awesome. We visited it on an unusually sunny day which happened to be the day of the 8th anniversary of our wedding. It was high tide when we got there so we couldn’t get closer to the rock. It was a beautiful spot nonetheless. I loved it and am glad that we found it even though its locations is a bit off the beaten path.

As we were driving out of the area, we were stopped by a young farmer who explained to us in broken English that the road was closed (in actuality, it was blocked by a tractor; it was a narrow, dirt road) because they were trying to get a flock of sheep to another pasture across the road. Three people were involved in the whole ordeal. They looked so frustrated and the flock of sheep so panicky. The whole thing lasted for about 10 minutes but I don’t think we would have minded so much if it had lasted longer because it was actually rather entertaining to watch.

So, if someone asked me how many Icelandic farmers it takes to get a flock of sheep across the road, I’d confidently say: it takes three, and a tractor.